Lost in a Wilderness

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Lonely mountains growing in a rocky wilderness rise up on all sides of a sullen orphan boy as he wanders aimlessly on a path through the dreariness. Everywhere he looks there are signs he has seen before and come to acknowledge as confirmations that he will always be lost.

But as the picture moves back and a larger view is shown, there is a harlequin using marionette paddles and strings to lift rocks and barriers into place all around this child. Behind the harlequin is a room full of brilliant gold items and stunning gemstones… but they are all hidden by the mountains and rocks the harlequin is moving around.

As the boy moves toward a brighter spot in the wilderness, the sinister puppeteer realizes the sheen from the gold and gems are illuminating part of the boy’s path so he takes one hand and spreads out his trench coat to cover the treasure’s light and stop it from shining on the despairing child’s false world.

Then a Hawk appears in the sky and begins circling the boy over the rocky scene. The harlequin shows frustration at its presence but is too busy working the marionette sticks to engage the hawk… although he tries with futility by waving the corners of his elbows in its direction. The hawk starts to swoop down around the boy who confuses this ally to be yet another dart in the barrage of discouragement, but the hawk is only after drawing the child’s attention. It lands on a large boulder directly in front of the boy and stares intently at him. Then when the child has lifted his gaze to question the strange countenance of the bird, the hawk suddenly grows 3 sizes and, digging its talons into the stone like it was paper mache, it takes off carrying the stone with it.

The harlequin is furious as the stone has left a gaping hole in the discouraging scene he has worked so hard to create but the boy is riveted at the treasure he sees through the new portal.

As he looks, the harlequin quickly pulls several strings and a bush, thick and thorny grows up before his eyes and covers the hole’s access entirely.

The hawk swoops down again to gain the boy’s attention and once it has his attention, the bird dive bombs another rock sending it hurling; again the rock resembles something ridiculously light, but it also exposes another hole. Before the hawk flies off this time, it grabs a bush some distance away from the stone it just smashed and now the boy is astonished seeing two holes in the firmament.

While the child begins running toward one of the holes, the harlequin – now furious – throws one of the marionette controls at the bird but this only results in 5 more holes showing up before the child and the boy slows his running down to peer into the new portals. He realizes quickly that all holes a showing him different angles of the same picture and for the first time he looks up and sees the deceptive puppeteer. With a questioning glance at the hawk the boy receives unspoken encouragement from the bird’s eyes and the child begins yelling accusations of protests at the harlequin who shrieks, turns and begins running. As he flees, the strings of all his scenery now reveal that they are attached to various parts of his body. With the flight of the deceptor goes all traces of the false wilderness the boy once found himself in. The child rushes in to the midst of all the jewels, gold and innumerable treasures making a dash for the one item that captures his heart: a gold and sapphire set of curved stairs leading to the highest point in the radiant scene. Running to the top, he stands boldly and holds out his hand toward the hawk… with the biggest smile spread wide upon the face of the child who once had no hope.

Flying away, the hawk finally calls back, speaking for the first time “Do not look to me, but to Him from whom I was sent.